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    Beyonce Biography

    Born: September 04, 1981

    One of the most recognizable characters in modern-day R&B, Beyoncé first rose to fame as the siren-voiced centerpiece of Destiny's Child before embarking on a multi-platinum solo career in 2001. Booming record sales, Grammy awards, movie roles, and a romance with rapper/CEO Jay-Z combined to heighten her profile in the 2000s, making the singer a virtual mainstay in the entertainment world. While some media outlets derisively championed Paris Hilton as "the next Marilyn Monroe," Beyoncé was a much better contender for the role, her glittering pop culture persona only matched by her success onscreen and on record.



    Born in Houston in September 1981, Beyoncé Giselle Knowles began performing at age seven, winning upwards of 30 local competitions for her dancing and vocal abilities. She also joined her cousin Kelly Rowland and classmates LaTavia Roberson and LeToya Luckett in forming an adolescent vocal group. Mathew Knowles, Beyoncé's father and Rowland's legal guardian, signed on to be the girls' manager, eventually quitting his full-time job to focus on their efforts. This situation would ultimately lead to the creation of one of the most popular female R&B groups of all time -- Destiny's Child.




    Destiny's Child gained momentum throughout the 1990s, appearing on Star Search in 1992 (under the name Girl's Tyme) and weathering several lineup changes before signing to Columbia Records in 1997. Four studio albums later, the group has officially become the best-selling female group of all time, with such smash hits as "Jumpin' Jumpin'," "Bills, Bills, Bills," "Say My Name," and "Survivor" bolstering the girls' momentum despite a continued string of lawsuits from former members Roberson and Luckett (who contested Mathew Knowles' management, claiming he withheld profits and unjustly favored his daughter and niece). In 2001, Beyoncé, Rowland, and replacement member Michelle Williams allowed themselves a break from the group to pursue individual solo careers. Before landing several movie roles, Beyoncé became the first African-American female artist and second woman ever to win the annual ASCAP Pop Songwriter of the Year Award. An appearance in the MTV drama Carmen: A Hip Hopera quickly followed, but it was her role as Foxxy Cleopatra in 2002's Austin Powers in Goldmember that established Beyoncé as a true Hollywood star.



    While her inclusion on the movie's soundtrack failed to chart nationally, Beyoncé's full-length solo debut, 2003's Dangerously in Love, reached multi-platinum status. Featuring collaborations with Sean Paul, Missy Elliott, OutKast's Big Boi, and romantic interest Jay-Z, the album spawned a total of four Top Ten singles and garnered the singer five Grammys. Destiny's Child reconvened the following year to release Destiny Fulfilled; upon completing the resulting tour, the group issued one final album, a greatest-hits compilation entitled 1's, and subsequently disbanded. Beyoncé turned her full attention to her burgeoning solo career, releasing the sophomore effort B'day in September 2006 and, three months later, turning in an award-winning performance for the movie musical Dreamgirls. The singer then embarked on the Beyoncé Experience concert tour, releasing a live DVD in November 2007.



    The following year proved to be another busy one as Beyoncé landed the role of Etta James in Cadillac Records, a musical biopic that explored the heyday of Chicago's Chess Records. Shooting commenced in February 2008, with Beyoncé also serving as co-executive producer. One month before the film's December release, the singer released her third studio album, I Am...Sasha Fierce. The double-disc effort emphasized her two distinct personalities, allowing Beyoncé to explore both mainstream sounds and traditional R&B. Some live releases followed. 2009's I Am...Yours, a CD/DVD set, documented an August 2009 performance at Wynn Las Vegas. 2010's I Am...World Tour, available in separate audio and video formats, was recorded at London's significantly larger O2 Arena (a few months after the Vegas program). Andrew Leahey, Rovi






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    FASHION ICON: BEYONCE'S BEAUTY SECRETS!




    The last rays of afternoon sun are streaming through the window of a Manhattan loft where Beyoncé Knowles sits resplendent in a sleeveless sapphire blue dress and stilettos sharper than ice picks. Despite an epically hectic past few months in which she’s scooped up six Grammy Awards; launched her spicy-sweet debut fragrance, Beyoncé Heat, with a late-night party inNew York (it has since broken sales records for celebrity scents); and wrapped up her yearlong “I Am…” tour, the superstar shows not a hint of wear and tear. “I’m running on adrenaline!” she says, her voice honeyed with a surprisingly strong Texas drawl. “I’m too happy to feel tired.”

    As a 16-time Grammy winner, a Golden Globe–nominated actress, a House of Deréon fashion muse, a perfume-brand powerhouse, and the woman who got Jay-Z to put a ring on it, Beyoncé has racked up almost too many accomplishments to tally since first rising to fame with Destiny’s Child more than a decade ago. Whether elegantly serenading the Obamas on Inauguration Night while flashing gunmetal Minx nails, stomping across the stage as bouffant-hairdo-and-Thierry Mugler-sporting alter ego Sasha Fierce on her stadium-wowing megatours, or vamping it up in black lipstick alongside Lady Gaga in the recent “Telephone” video, she’s a bona fide beauty icon who always manages to balance knockout sex appeal with good-girl charm. It’s therefore something of a relief to discover that when the superbusy star finally does get some sleep, she’ll be slipping under the covers with Aquaphor smeared on her face. “I go to bed looking totally greasy,” Beyoncé says, laughing. “It’s not all glamour all the time.”

    Are there similarities between music and perfume?
    When I write songs, I want them to be sensual and sexy, so women can go out on the dance floor and feel free and strong—like they can say whatever they want to say, especially to the opposite sex. And that’s what I wanted Heat to do too. You feel more confident when you’re wearing a fragrance you love.

    Any anti-fatigue beauty tricks?
    I always keep a pair of Ray-Bans handy! And sometimes I put a little gold eye shadow in the inner corners of my eyes—it’s more subtle than white, but it still really makes you look more awake.

    What do you use to give your body skin that velvety sheen?
    I layer on bronzers for public appearances. I love L’Oréal Paris Sublime Bronze One Day gel, which you can just get at Walmart, and Scott Barnes Body Bling is also great.

    You do your own makeup for performances. Why not use a makeup artist?
    It’s a way of getting into the zone—it’s part of becoming Sasha Fierce. I’m able to sit down for an hour and play around with makeup, which I find really relaxing and fun. Before a tour, I have my makeup artist design a look for me—she draws it on paper to show me where to put everything.

    How important is hair and makeup for getting into film roles?
    Very. Especially playing Etta James in Cadillac Records—once I put on that blond wig and those thick eyebrows, I felt much more natural in her skin. That’s one of the things I love about makeup: You can change your whole attitude just by doing your eyeliner or lipstick differently.

    What are some of your staple red-carpet tricks?
    I use a makeup primer, and then I use a lot of powder to keep everything in place. I usually go for a waterproof mascara, or a strip of false lashes when I’m onstage, so I won’t get smudgy. And I love L’Oréal Paris Elnett hairspray—it holds like nothing else.

    Your mom owned a hair salon when you were growing up. Did you try out a lot of styles?
    Oh, yeah. I’m sure it was scary for her because I was always messing with my hair when I was a kid. One of the worst things I did was cut my ponytails off. I saw my mom doing extensions, so I thought she’d be able to put them back on. Thankfully I had separated my hair into quarters and I only cut off the front two ponytails. Afterward I had to have really thick bangs for a while.

    Did it make you more fearless about experimenting as an adult?
    Definitely. I’m still always doing something to my hair—cutting layers, or bleaching it, or taking it upon myself to copy fashionable hairstyles without knowing the necessary techniques. A couple of weeks ago, I cut my own bangs and put highlights in the front. When my stylist saw me, she was like, “What did you do?!” I did a pretty good job, but she still had to fix it. We’re always joking that I’m a frustrated hairdresser.

    How often do you exercise?
    I’ve never been all that consistent. If I’m onstage doing a performance for two and a half hours, I don’t really think I need to do anything else. So when I’m on tour, I let it slide. But I just started working out at the Tracy Anderson gym. It’s hard work!

    Tracy Anderson is known for reshaping people’s bodies. Is that what you want?
    Not really; I’m pretty happy. I want to get my arms a bit leaner, but other than that, it’s just maintenance.

    Do you follow a specific diet?
    Well, I don’t eat pasta every day. I’m not trying to lose or gain weight, but I do have to work out and watch what I eat. I’m not someone who can go crazy. I’ll usually have cereal for breakfast and a salad for lunch and a light dinner, and then on Sundays I’ll allow myself to have whatever I want.

    You famously did the Master Cleanse for your role in Dreamgirls. Would you ever do it again?
    Never. I did it to lose weight really fast, but it wasn’t fun. There are healthier ways to lose weight—I wouldn’t recommend it.

    Source: www.elle.com




















































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